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Just_a_spoonie

866d

My physical therapist told me today that my pain may never go away fully, and it's so hard to hear that from a doctor, even when my chronic pain has been going on for 2.5 years. How do you accept that things may never get better? It's really rough for me physically and mentally to think about that, but I know it's a possibility at this point.

Top reply
    • minecraftbees

      853d

      i was rlly young when i was told ab my bullshit, so i kind of just cried and learned to adapt. some of us are born with disadvantages and it's super fucking sad, im still sad ab it. but im trying to think of ways that things can be at least manageable ? and seeing more doctors is never s bad thing if you feel like there's something else that can be done. much love.

    • minecraftbees

      853d

      i was rlly young when i was told ab my bullshit, so i kind of just cried and learned to adapt. some of us are born with disadvantages and it's super fucking sad, im still sad ab it. but im trying to think of ways that things can be at least manageable ? and seeing more doctors is never s bad thing if you feel like there's something else that can be done. much love.

    • Noodlemum

      858d

      I'm not sure if you're religious, but Jesus is hands down the only thing that has helped me. He promises us a day with no pain, where He will wipe away every tear. And He cares so much, he wants to hear every woe we carry (1 Peter 5:7). He alone is what gets me through the day sometimes.

    • Jimfi1955

      860d

      I know that feeling when it was told to me some 6 years ago after my first spinal surgery. I remember crying for most of the day. Know one thing, you will adapt and survive.

    • catdad22

      865d

      I don’t have much as far as advice or solutions go, but I feel this so much.

    • Kapphire

      866d

      For me laughing and making jokes about it helps. My mom always says it’s better to laugh about it than to cry about it. Crying just gives you a headache. So stay strong and laugh.

    • goblin49

      866d

      I worry about that too, my rheumatologist basically told me I'll probably just have to keep having surgeries to solve symptoms but that's it. I understand grieving a previously healthier, "happier" life. But I think that's sort of the key to it: although you may have to lose some of the things that used to make you happy, finding new activities, hobbies, etc to do dive into helps to establish a new normal, a new standard for happiness that includes your health a little more. Plus just talking about that grief makes it a lot more manageable: it's already frustrating and scary enough to be living with chronic pain, but so many people feel the same way and can help put things in a better perspective.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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