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leify22

106d

how do you deal with crashes? I'm realising this is what I've been dealing with for a while now. advice/ tips would be greatly appreciated

Top reply
    • Possum8910

      102d

      This may sound silly but what type of crash? Like emotional, sugar, blood pressure, ect. I ask bc I have different types of crashes and have to do different things for different ones.

    • Possum8910

      102d

      This may sound silly but what type of crash? Like emotional, sugar, blood pressure, ect. I ask bc I have different types of crashes and have to do different things for different ones.

    • DragonflyHKD

      105d

      If you're not already familiar, I'd first look into spoon theory. In a nutshell, if our energy levels were represented by a bunch of spoons, we only have so many spoons and it can differ from day to day. Activities throughout the day use up spoons. Basically, I try to imagine how much energy I've got in my battery that day and adjust my activities or number of naps accordingly. I also recommend doing a search for "chronic illness pacing" because pacing ourselves based on daily energy levels is very important to avoid crashing. On average, I tend to only have energy for a short, light activity earlier in the day and I have to save my energy for my more intense evening activity which is usually one of the many things I do for exercise. If needed, I try to take a nap at some point during the day. I also recommend using accessibility devices such as a shower chair or bench if it's needed to save on energy while showering. If you cook, use a chopper to save time (I'm stubborn and have good knife skills but my partner uses a chopper) or buy easy or premade meals if necessary. If you're able, don't be afraid to ask for help too. I'm lucky that my partner understands my fatigue and is open to helping when needed. Hope this was helpful, take care!

    • Lunarr

      106d

      If you can I highly recommend taking a few hours to rest properly - no TV or phone, no music, no book, just laying in a dark and quiet room to give your body a break. If you fall asleep that's okay but you don't have to. I like to say you should never underestimate the power of laying down! If you continue to push through your crash, even by doing small tasks, you will most likely make it worse. If you need tips on preventing crashes in the future just let me know. It's rough, I know, there really isn't anything to do but wait for it to pass which is extremely frustrating

      • leify22

        106d

        @Lunarr tips for preventing would be awesome

        • Lunarr

          104d

          @leify22 I definitely second the things the other user commented on here, particularly the pacing. Take frequent breaks during tasks. Sit instead of stand, avoid rushing around and running, etc. bc those all waste energy. You need to stop while you're ahead, if you feel bad you already pushed yourself too far. If you have PEM, sometimes a crash won't set it for a few hours or days so it's very easy to overdo and feel decent then pay for it later. Also if you have PEM please don't fall for graded exercise therapy as it actively will make you feel worse. Over time, if you pace yourself even just okay enough your energy envelope might grow a bit and you'll be able to do more, it's about allowing your body to build up a tolerance without crashing interfering Something I found extremely helpful for my ME/CFS was anaerobic threshold monitoring. I started it in April and since have gained a lot more energy than I used to have. Using this formula (220 - age * .6) you can calculate the heartrate you are allowed to reach before your body starts burning extra energy. Use .5 instead if your fatigue is extreme. My number was 119 but I rounded down to 115 just to be safe. Some places will give a different formula but this one worked for me. Using my Fitbit, I tried diligently to keep my HR under 115 even when walking (had to stop using stairs when possible even just a few) and the results have been wild!! I felt a solid difference in energy within a month and it's only gotten better, I can do a lot more without crashing than I used to. It takes a lot of patience, pauses with slow breathing to calm the HR, and slowing your walking speed among other things until your body adjusts but I highly highly recommend trying it out, google "anaerobic thershold ME/CFS" to read more if you want But yeah! This is really long but basically take it easy lol. Nap if you need to, 20 minutes is usually all I need if I'm starting to feel bad, you're sick and need to rest. If you work or school somewhere look into acccommodations to allow you to sit instead of stand, avoid walking long distances, etc, if you're in the US they legally have to bc of the ADA (I can expand on that if you'd like). Hope this was helpful, we're all in this fatigue journey together 👍 Wish you all the best

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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One way to deal with crashes is by trying to enjoy the good times and not letting the dread of what could happen take over. If things do crash, remember the good times you've been having, knowing you can get back there. Another suggestion is to do something in your comfort zone when you have time off, such as playing games, watching a movie, tidying up and reorganizing a room in your home, or even picking up old hobbies. Journaling or focusing on something simple but distracting enough to be able to just focus on that can also help.

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