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idk_182

267d

Can I get a wheelchair for my hypermobility? They're not sure yet if I have HEDS or just HSD but I need physical therapy either way which I have not started yet. I'm finding it very difficult to do longer journeys at the moment meaning I am missing out on a lot of my life when I could be going on days out with my family and friends. I am okay for short distances. Could probably use a walking stick to help one of my legs that is extremely painful some days but that doesn't concern me too much. I understand I may not need it after physical therapy however just right now I'm missing out of a lot because I can't do the walking to get there you know? People keep telling me if I use any mobility aids I'll just deteriorate which is a bit scary but on the other hand... I can't do the things I want to do right now which is really upsetting. I'm not sure what to do. I've seem others use mobility aids for their HSD and HEDS but everyone seems to be making me feel bad about even asking if I could too.

Top reply
    • lymepartner

      266d

      See about getting a rollator walker. Medicare provides them. Maybe Medicaid too. You still walk but have support. Plus they have a seat if you get tired. They can also be purchased online. I totally understand about needing quality of life. I have multiple health issues. One of the most important things for me is to be able to meet friends for lunch, etc. Or go to the park.

    • lymepartner

      266d

      I have a Collapsible can I store in the seat of my rolling walker for when the walker will not fit in tight spaces

    • lymepartner

      266d

      See about getting a rollator walker. Medicare provides them. Maybe Medicaid too. You still walk but have support. Plus they have a seat if you get tired. They can also be purchased online. I totally understand about needing quality of life. I have multiple health issues. One of the most important things for me is to be able to meet friends for lunch, etc. Or go to the park.

    • SillyGooseGoose

      266d

      If you feel like you need a mobility aid, get one! The only one I don't recommend is crutches because they're horrible for long distances. After I had my knee surgery to tack down my luxating patella from my own hypermobility issues (no EDS), I used it all, wheelchair, walker, crutches, and cane. I'm not an expert in the wheelchair as I only used that for a very short time, but the main thing you need to worry about with that is that other people can and will try to push you, even when you don't want them to. The walker is very good for stability, and if you need to carry many items, you can get a little basket to go on the front without adding more weight to your own body. The only problem with that is that it's not the best at getting through tight spaces (like between desk aisles in a public school classroom, trust me I should know!) If you have a basket with many things, it can also tip over if you don't have your hands on the handles all the time, which is why I had a removable basket. Crutches are fabulous for short distance walking and keeping your entire weight off a leg that is unhappy, but if they're not at exactly the right height for you, they dig into your shoulders and turn your hands red. Not to mention, it can also be hard to keep upright for a long period of time. Lastly, the cane was my favorite mobility aid, and I still have to use it sometimes. It's lightweight, it's easy to rely on, and people will generally get out of your way when they see you have one, although it's easy to use in all sizes of spaces. I used it for months after my surgery, through physical therapy and I still keep it in my car in case I'm having a bad day on my university campus. Of all the mobility aids, I recommend the cane on days when you feel okay to one leg being rather painful, or the wheelchair if you're having a bad day painwise, although wheelchairs can be significantly more expensive than canes. Next, do not worry about needing to be "hurt" enough to need a mobility aid. If you were completely able-bodied and knew there was no way you needed a mobility aid, you should not use a mobility aid. But if you are feeling great pain in your legs and feel like you need one, which it sounds like you do, then get one and use it. You will not deteriorate and your condition will not worsen, it will only help you to feel better and will actually help you get stronger as you'll be able to cover longer distances (but don't overexert yourself!) Nobody should make you feel like you're a bad person for needing a little extra help - we're all different people and we need different things to help us reach our full potential. Lastly, and this wasn't in the question but me giving a little unsolicited advice, get copper stabilizing knee braces. You can get them at Walgreens for cheap. Get the type that completely covers your knee, in black so you don't have to worry about matching. For some reason, the copper has worked wonders on my knee more than any other knee brace, and it's also helped my grandmother tremendously. Don't worry about other people, you know what you need and you can't ignore your own body. If you need to, say that in the mirror every morning until you believe it. "I know what I need and I can't ignore my body." Hope this helps and hope you feel better ❤️

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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"Mobility aids have no minimum struggle requirement. If you feel like your mobility/quality of life would improve by using a wheelchair or other mobility aid, then that's enough to use one. Some people with hypermobility syndrome and HEDS do use mobility aids such as wheelchairs, canes, and rollators. It's a personal decision and if it helps you, then you deserve to have it."

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