Youre_Not_Alone333

573d

Looking into weight lifting once I am cleared for exercise again. Has anyone else heard this to be safe and helpful with hEDS? TIA!

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Top reply
    • AraS

      572d

      I was a competitive powerlifter. Lifting weights was the best thing I ever could have done for myself. The muscles supported my weird joints and I had minimal dislocations for 20yrs. I stopped lifting b/c of a car accident, and within 5 yrs of that, stability became a real issue. I returned to lifting (and started aerial yoga) after 3 shoulder surgeries and 4 ankle surgeries. Doings so much better now. Be careful of machines as the restrict range of motion. That’s how a lot of injuries can happen. Never lift alone - always have a spotter, even for the lighter weights. If you haven’t lifted before, work with someone who has to work on proper form and schedules.

    • Possumrice

      572d

      Taking more time to get into the stretching and prepping phase before your workouts has always helped me and another of my friend with EDS. Additionally, make sure to track your sessions, lifts, sets, etc, so that when your body seeks for the adrenaline when in a possible workout-high (yes it does exist), you can be aware of whether you’re pushing yourself too far.

    • AraS

      572d

      I was a competitive powerlifter. Lifting weights was the best thing I ever could have done for myself. The muscles supported my weird joints and I had minimal dislocations for 20yrs. I stopped lifting b/c of a car accident, and within 5 yrs of that, stability became a real issue. I returned to lifting (and started aerial yoga) after 3 shoulder surgeries and 4 ankle surgeries. Doings so much better now. Be careful of machines as the restrict range of motion. That’s how a lot of injuries can happen. Never lift alone - always have a spotter, even for the lighter weights. If you haven’t lifted before, work with someone who has to work on proper form and schedules.

    • TanzieLuv

      572d

      I am not too sure about weight lifting but what I have noticed regarding my own experience is that when I lost my muscles, my body was at it’s most vulnerable ever with joint instability and as I have put more muscle back on it has helped a lot in stability.

    • SAMHAIN

      572d

      AFAIK all exercise is generally helpful for all EDS esp hEDS because you need to strengthen the muscles that support your connective-tissue-disrupted joints. It's the only way to help directly, really. I guess that's why most EDS is dx's any decade outside your 20s—too young & it gets noticed as odd, and 20s are your physical prime and generally more naturally active bc social etc, then folks have "deconditioning" life events in their 30s like pregnancy, car wrecks, sedentary job changes, and your musculature can no longer make up for the other problems and you suddenly notice how terrible you feel 😪

    • SAMHAIN

      572d

      I was an extremely active chef & baker working 40-80 from 17-32 and then got in my 3rd t-boned totaling, was pretty badly shaken up in there, had to go through 2mos of chiro which wasnt near enough, and then all of the sudden all these subluxing issues and "ouch i just had a tendon snap out of place" and "what the heck how did i just pinch a nerve" problems came waterfalling "out of nowhere"

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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