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Alyh

609d

so I'm writing an article now about autism. I'm wondering what are some things you notice about your autism? things you wished others knew? Things people are misinformed with or questions they often ask? me being autistic I think writing this can help a bit with nt understanding

Top reply
    • Lin92

      607d

      I seem "normal" except in crowds of new people. I get awkward and stimmy. Anecdotal conversation is how I do things. I don't reciprocate questions all that well, and people don't realize that I'm expecting them to just relate and continue their end of the conversation. It often brings things to a screeching halt, and I get anxious that they're annoyed with me or something.

    • Lin92

      607d

      I seem "normal" except in crowds of new people. I get awkward and stimmy. Anecdotal conversation is how I do things. I don't reciprocate questions all that well, and people don't realize that I'm expecting them to just relate and continue their end of the conversation. It often brings things to a screeching halt, and I get anxious that they're annoyed with me or something.

    • Chuubacca

      607d

      not every autistic person is the same!!! and that we aren’t stuck as a person bc of autism. we can grow and adapt to our environments, and can live successful lives. our challenges should be accommodated, but we shouldn’t be infantilized for them

    • AriEden

      608d

      I'm an adult and I like sex and yes I am still autistic during sex and even tho it is true that autism has made me somewhat naive it does not mean I can't choose partners for myself, I just need a little help making sure I'll be safe.

      • AriEden

        608d

        @AriEden also the first time I tried to get assessed my GP said I can't be autistic bc I had friends, and now I really don't want to try to get prof diagnosed bc that rejection hurt me so much and held me back from learning to help myself. ppl need to accept that children and teens can know themselves better than a gp they see twice a year. and also obviously autistic people can have friends??

      • AriEden

        608d

        @AriEden what else? oh just because we have a talent in something doesn't mean we have to use that talent. I was a gifted kid in math, I have an IQ of 131, I could go into math or coding if I wanted to and probably excel at it but I don't wanna lmao. I wanna be a school psychologist! oh yeah, we can go into fields that involve people and emotions, astonishing! (joke)

    • LexiTheLilypad

      608d

      That autism makes you "dumb", it doesn't. So many people are misinformed about autism, and its sad that people stereotype autism.

    • roberri

      608d

      would like to apologize before posting cause this is gonna be long. sorry!!! masking. the only difference between so called “high functioning” and “low functioning” is the ability to fit into social situations. (not saying it is not a spectrum. there are definitely people on the spectrum who have a more severe diagnosis). i don’t think i’m seen as “normal” (whatever that is). however, i don’t think i’m perceived as someone on the spectrum either. between the ability to parrot someone else, the trick to look at a forehead to mimic eye contact, i am probably just perceived as a quiet/shy/bored person. i am of course lucky for this socially, and treated drastically different than the people on the spectrum that fit the stereotypes. however, because i was taught from a young age to act a certain way with adults, i was never taken seriously when i told everyone i was having a hard time because of my sensory issues. only dismissed because i wasn’t violent or academically challenged. i know that situation is not unique, but i find it important to bring up. i was not diagnosed with asd until i was able to advocate for myself as an adult. it’s still so fresh, and i’m dealing with the grief of what could have been, had the adults in my life listened to me. i know a lot of friends of mine who are about at the same stage. i still have a hard time knowing who i am without masking, and it’s hard to stop and actually put to words what i am dealing with. it’s frustrating. it’s disappointing. i believe it can be different if we are more open about talking about these situations. it’s interesting how social masking is such a sacrifice for people on the spectrum, while it’s a mild inconvenience for neurotypicals when we don’t.

    • HMarieezz

      609d

      Eye contact is a big thing, certain social skills, certain things are always more noticeable. Try to find some people with autism, you'll find out we are all different in our own ways.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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