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Shallan

213d

I've been struggling a lot with depression but I realised this week that even on days when I feel okay emotionally, I'm still completely exhausted and fatigued. I'm new to the chronic fatigue syndrome diagnosis even though it looks like this is something I've been dealing with for a long time. So I know this is a crazily broad question but...is there ANYTHING you guys have found that gives you energy? I'm already on antidepressants and ADHD meds. But I struggle SO MUCH to even get out of bed. And then to resist the urge to jump back into bed at the earliest opportunity. Any and all helpful thoughts would be SO appreciated 😭😭🥰🥰🤩🫂

Top reply
    • Jimmydean

      128d

      @BoneDustWoman What is that Diclofenac if you don't mind letting me know.

    • BoneDustWoman

      127d

      It's a prescription NSAID, typically prescribed to people with RA. OTC NSAIDs never got my systemic inflammation under control, which was a huge obstacle for me. I ended up getting prescribed Diclofenac after a car accident for whiplash and found that it reduced my inflammation in general, so I asked my doctor to refill it for me.

    • BoneDustWoman

      128d

      Honestly, nothing helps my fatigue except making sure I rest. I have to carefully manage my energy output (pacing) -- go to bed early, don't overcommit/overbook myself, don't "push through it" when I'm feeling fatigued. I also have systemic inflammation that's connected to it, and Diclofenac has helped with that a lot.

      • Jimmydean

        128d

        @BoneDustWoman What is that Diclofenac if you don't mind letting me know.

    • Runningtuba

      186d

      I understand. I struggle with depression, chronic fatigue and Fibro , so I’m right there with ya

    • 4byfour

      207d

      Tldr: Getting energy for me has been soley about positive reinforcement and trigger identification. I struggle with it, too. Going for a walk makes me feel sort of cloudy and glassy when other people seem totally with it. I used to give myself points. Essentially I was tricking my brain into seeing the ‘bright side’. So I could see that I didn’t eat breakfast or lunch. And I’d feel confused, sad, and disappointed in myself. But I’d give myself a point for the granola bar I ate half of. Despite the thoughts and feelings I was having, my brain was still being tricked into at least acknowledging in some degree that I got a point that day. This was my first big step into learning how to replace the love I wasn’t getting from other people. This has helped reduce the power of many of the triggers that drain my energy. I did it up until I was running 3 times a week and eating at least 1 meal a day for about 2 months. I’m picking back up again after 2 months of confusion. When I go backwards, I still try to acknowledge what I did right. It doesn’t matter how far back I am, I did things right. It’s just that I deserve to want and fight for good consequences. When I smoke weed, I noticed I lose interest in functioning like that. It lasts for about 24 hours after smoking, especially if I’m smoking for multiple days at a time. They say dopamine isn’t the reward, it’s the drive and desire to have something, which is drained out of your system for a while when you hijack it. I always spend the first half of the day wondering why I’m being ‘lazy’, ‘unappreciative’ and ‘useless’. (However, on a ‘trigger’ day, weed helps me function and bypass depressive episodes. I just have to be wise about it.) Oftentimes, I remember it was just a trigger. I’ve learned to identify triggers. I tend to have delayed reactions, so if I breakup with someone, or if I lose a family member, or who knows what, I tend to not realize I’m grieving until a long time later. I’ll be totally fine and normal when and while it happens, and I’ll handle the situation like a queen, but then I’ll wonder why I can’t develop relationships, or wonder why I’m not eating, or wonder why I’m doing this or that. Hence, everything is exhausting because I’m functioning ‘normally’ in a headspace that doesn’t ever feel rewarded by normal behavior. So my advice, recognize where you’re hurting. Reward yourself for things that are good for you, and recognize when something isn’t a reward, even if you think it should be. Then, rinse and repeat. Just train your brain to release dopamine. Your brain is a great actress, just keep going.

      • 4byfour

        207d

        @4byfour Idk. I hope this helps. I just know that my brain has a dopamine deficiency. So I’m training it like a muscle. It may work for you, it may not. Thank you so so so much for reading

    • vicky123

      212d

      Lower Carb, Vitamin b1 and D ribose are cheap and easy to take. It's complicated because I have a similar issues but with other chronic illnesses. It's like juggling, you don't know what day or time you'll have motivation, low pain, energy, concentration align enough to function well enough and get stuff done. Give yourself grace, it's incredibly hard to manage multiple conditions and bad days are part of the process.

    • KitTheKat

      212d

      For me, sometimes it can be helpful to lay out some really comfy clothes right next to my bed. I can even get dressed while in bed, but ive found that if I can get dressed, it's a little easier to start doing other things, like brushing my teeth, or making lunch etc. it might just be me though, because I find getting dressed to be one of the more daunting parts of getting up, but making it so I'm still comfy and moving at least a little can make a difference- idk if that'll be any help for you, but it helps me :) ♡

    • heidiheidiheidi

      213d

      take risks dating or make new friends, start over start something new like a workout journey or apply for a job, take classes for something you find potentially interesting, hope this somewhat helped 🤷‍♀️💗💗🫂😁

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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One suggestion is to get blood tests done to check your vitamin levels, specifically Potassium, Iron, Vitamin D, and Vitamin B3. Low levels of these vitamins can contribute to fatigue. Additionally, it's important to communicate with your healthcare provider about your symptoms and explore potential treatments or adjustments to your current medications. Some people have found relief through exercise, such as yoga, but it's essential to find what works best for you and consult with a professional.

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