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trentelton

787d

hello! if anyone knows much about sleep i’d love some help currently i’m sleeping around 10-12 hours of sleep and it’s just hard to go to sleep 12 hours before i need to wake up (i sleep through any and all sounds and vibration alarm clocks that i’ve used so far) so i was wondering if anyone had tips on how i can sleep less and maybe a solution to me sleeping through my alarms im wanting switch jobs as mine is just so draining to me now but i feel so stuck and like it’s impossible because i can’t wake up on time ):

Top reply
    • SAMHAIN

      786d

      There is no such thing as "catching up on sleep," is the real talk... if you missed it then you have to just keep going bc time is linear. Pull up "sleep debt" on wiki 👍

    • SAMHAIN

      786d

      There is no such thing as "catching up on sleep," is the real talk... if you missed it then you have to just keep going bc time is linear. Pull up "sleep debt" on wiki 👍

    • jazz1987

      787d

      U should go to a sleep study and make sure u don't have sleep apnea. People who have that need a lot more sleep to catch up for the worse quality of sleep

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      If you sleep through all noise, old bell alarms, your ringtone chime, yelling your name from a recording, those clocks that shine a light in your face, the scale-alarm you must stand on to shut off, the wind-up robots that run around and make you chase them, the dogs begging you to turn the things off ... And maybe you also don't dream, or much ... and maybe often wake with literally paralysed limbs that don't even return a pins-and-needles feedback for 10 minutes after waking from lack of circulation because you slept like a literal rock... Then your brain is akin to mine in at least one way. And that's not advisable. 😅 Mine seems to be a combination of issues, check my profile to get a grasp. I am FINALLY getting my sleep analysed in the next few weeks. Feel free to DM, and I'll make a note to update you on results and what I learned. So, finally, that brings us to: 6) I would highly, HIGHLY suggest relaying exactly this inquiry which you brought to us to your PCP and any therapist or psych*ist you see, if you do. If your PCP or psych*ist doesn't take that info and immediately set you up a referral to a sleep clinic, tell them to their face, calmly, yet sternly: that you "would like a second opinion." If this becomes s problem or a challenge, seek a new PCP. You must be your own advocate. If you have any disability conditions (I see you have one listed which is particularly linked to sleep problems and this exact issue of sleeping as the dead), then the whole study and your new CPAP will be covered by insurance. All The Best Of Luck 💤🙏

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      5) Do you snore? This is *very important. People blow it off because "it's normal, my so-and-so shored so loudly that... " But, there is no "normal" for human biology or behaviour. This opinion is objectively false. Every human's sleep will be affected by mood, stress, responsibilities, room temperature...(Did youk now that you physiologically have to drop your core temperature 2⁰F for your brain to allow you to activate sleep? This is why we tend to hang a hand or a footout of the sheets—they're heatsinks —you're dumping excess heat!). But snoring is *not* in any way, shape, or form a positive for your process. So, calling it "normal" is misguided at best, willfully ignorant at worst. Snoring is a direct trait of sleep apnea, and the staccato'd breaths mean your brain and blood aren't getting the proper oxygen levels; so you're essentially slowly, lightly, strangling yourself. Until it gets heavier, or stops you entirely. This is the more severe, or acute, trait that really demands immediate attention. Stopping breathing when you're sleeping means you're giving yourself brain damage every. single. night. Because you're literally choking out and then that cough or sputter a few seconds later is you gasping for air from your brain's blood-CO2 sensor triggering "asphyxiation emergency!" The drop in O2 and rise in CO2 which isn't flushed out by exhalation can cause heart palpitations, liver, and kidney damage. It's no joke.

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      I, personally, don't recommend taking exogenous synthetic melatonin, as that stuff gives me and many others absolutely horrific sleep paralysis, aka "night terrors" where your brain is awake but the ability to control your body stays switched off, and your brain freaks with paranoia because this situation is strange and unusual and very dangerous for a thin-skinned mammal with zero natural defenses. So it makes up murderous nightmare scenarios bc you can't move voluntarily but you're semi-aware. I wouldn't honestly wish it on anyone.

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      4) Limit bright and artificial light at night, within 2 hours of bed. The colour doesn't actually matter (folks say "blue" and to use "red filters" but any spectrum of light entering your eyes IMMEDIATELY deactivates your melatonin production, which is what makes you feel sleepy and able to get to sleep. Red filters or lenses can help to reduce the intensity though, since red is the longest wavelength, so they're not a terrible idea).

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      3) Muy importante: Don't eat closer than 3-4 hours before sleep, or your metabolism will keep churning and it'll be harder to get to sleep. Since you won't get restful sleep until that slows, you will constantly feel like you're paying sleep debt without benefit, and it could be harder to wake "on time" since you're just getting into the actual middle of your sleep since your body started late. It also raises cholesterol, risk of heart attack, almost certainly generates GERD if you didn't already suffer, and can push your system into Type 2 Diabetes behaviour.

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      2) Keeping a routine to keep all your circadian rhythms (24 hour cycles including all cell functions, not just "sleep cycle"—common misconception) in check is very key as well. Use a planner or set up a #BuJo and start hitting goals.

    • SAMHAIN

      787d

      Oh, lort. Yes, yes I do... I could write a novella so I'll break up each separate idea so the information dump is tolerable 🤣🤙 First of all, set an attainable daily water goal (1.5L) and hit it for 2 weeks by having a check-off somewhere, then raise it 25% and hit that for 2 more. Period. Try for 3L if you wanna be a #waterchamp. An easy way to do this is to set a water bottle beside your bed and chug it right when you wake up, this will help offset GERD if you suffer, as well. You can also chug one before sleep, and this will almost ensure you will wake up on time because eventually your body is going to send that alarm for nature's call. I do this very often when I have something I cannot miss, because when you chug water it makes you waste out more of it anyway, and faster. Don't ask or google it unless you just slammed at least 8oz. Otherwise, get up and do that now, then go about your day. Start the goal. Coffee and tea and sugar waters are diuretics, they absorb water from your tissues and waste it out in your pee. These count as negative volume againstyour daily water goals. Don't cheat yourself, keep up if you drink that stuff. This is ridiculously important, I cannot stress enough how much every cell in your body depends on water to properly do everything it does. We are 60% water as mammalian earthling humans. Just... sip on that for a minute.

    • DutchJack

      787d

      This is probably the worst method to waking up early, is to think about it right before you fall asleep. Like: "OH NO, I NEED TO WAKE UP AT 87 OR ELSE I WILL DIE" And after some time it would have worked. Again, forcing everything isn't the rigt method but if it works and if it's not destructive, it's okay

    • ThatOneNerd

      787d

      I used to have a severe oversleeping problem. One of the things that helped the most is setting a morning routine. Now I get up and out of the house by 8 every weekday and I feel a lot better. Also treatment for trouble falling asleep if that’s a symptom you have. If you snore or wake up a lot possibly sleep apnea test.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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