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Jellibean_Lover

652d

Over a year after my third concussion I’m still having regular migraines where I can’t get out of bed. Feeling pretty down right now. Does it ever get better or will I always have bad days? Anyone have any tricks to help prevent PCS migraines? Thanks for your help. Hope you’re having a great day.

Top reply
    • Happy2behere

      649d

      If you have a Dr. Ask them for an injectable once a month migraine medication called Ajovy, tool most of my dehabilitaing morning migraines away

    • Happy2behere

      649d

      Your the first person I commented Too on this app😊😁

    • Happy2behere

      649d

      If you have a Dr. Ask them for an injectable once a month migraine medication called Ajovy, tool most of my dehabilitaing morning migraines away

      • Jellibean_Lover

        649d

        @Happy2behere since this is related to a workers comp case I am unable to see a doctor at this time (long, complicated story) but when I finally can I will be sure to explore this option!

        • Happy2behere

          649d

          @Jellibean_Lover hit me up I am dealing with a long complicated L and I case for years. I could be a great resource😁

    • Sunlit_Butterfly

      651d

      It does get better, if you put in the work and get the proper resource. During the worst of my recovery, I was going to 6 doctors appointments a week (vision and balance PT, biofeedback therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, chiropractor, and accupuncture). With PCS, you need to treat it from both the mental and physical sides, as it significantly affects both. For the physical, doing physical therapy to retrain your vestibular balance and your eye tracking is the best to retrain your brain on how to use those symptoms. I have also found that going to a chiropractor or massage therapist will help calm down the head and neck pain, as a lot of it is so to really tight muscles in the neck that wrap up and around the head. Learning how to massage my own neck and what stretches I can do to relax has been the most useful tool in giving me control over my own health, so ask your doctors lots of questions about what you can do! For the mental and emotional, pain management tools and meditation helped me the most. If you see a therapist or counselor, ask them if they know any pain management tools or if they can look into some for you. The most revolutionary thing that I was told was this: Every time we experience a physical sensation, we attach an emotion to it. The sensation itself may be fleeting, but the emotion is what hangs on and takes up brain space. For those of us who experience chronic pain, the emotions attached to those sensations will be huge and full of anxiety, anger, fear, regret, sadness, and more, which takes up so much brain space and makes it hard to think of anything else. But, if you can identify the emotion attached to the pain and process through that, the pain itself becomes so much more manageable.

      • Sunlit_Butterfly

        651d

        @Sunlit_Butterfly I want to amend this, I got so excited to share that I missed a detail. I said that it gets better, but that is not specific enough. I am over a year in from when PCS changed my life, I still live in daily chronic pain and struggle with my health. However, my ability to manage my health has gotten so much better. I am able to not just participate in a full life, but thrive in the new skills that I was able to build on. I have found tools to limit the impact of my health. After my original injury, I had to stop school, barely managed to graduate high school, could not drive myself, or write, or hold a conversation with my friends and family. Now, I am employed as a dog trainer and get to change the lives of both people and dogs, I am a strong and confident communicator in both professional and personal settings, I write poetry and beautiful essays, create all sorts of art, and, most excitingly, I am looking forward to starting college this fall as an honors student. I still live with daily chronic pain and mental health symptoms, often times worse than they were after my original injury. But, I am better. I am more in love with myself and my life than I was even before my original injury.

        • Jellibean_Lover

          651d

          @Sunlit_Butterfly wow. Just wow. You’re amazing and thank you so much for sharing this. All of my doctors kept telling me I need to separate my physical symptoms from my mental issues and I was getting so frustrated because it seemed impossible to do. This makes me feel so much better. This gives me hope. Thank you.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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