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moonbunnie

779d

hi :) my name is sucrose ! i asked a similar question to this before but i want it to reach a wider audience and hopefully get some advice. after struggling with symptoms of psychosis for years (mostly paranoid delusions and irrational thinking) i finally decided to seek help. i have a therapist who is kinda and understanding, and who does her best to help me. my main issue is whenever i have the opportunity to talk about my issues and receive help for them, i always freeze up and go along the route of “everything’s fine, i’ve been ok” even though my intense paranoia has kept me from developing personal relationships with people and and has ruined most relationships i have. i’m frustrated with myself- i’m put in a position that some people don’t get to have, but i can’t get the words out to explain to her how much i’ve been suffering. i think this may fall into a category of wanting to not be seen as “crazy” or “irrational” and wanting to be the perfect model patient and child who has nothing wrong with them. i just want some advice as to how to be more honest to my therapist and talk about things i might be too scared to talk about in general. thank u all so much for any responses it means so much to me :) <3

Top reply
    • Hb1989

      778d

      As a therapist my advice is to start off by saying exactly what you expressed in your post...."so I've been noticing that I tend to freeze up and say everything is fine. In all honesty though, I've been struggling and don't always know how to put my experience into words." Let your therapist guide you from there. Chances are they can sense youve been holding back and will see this as really positive breakthrough. Do they know you have a history of psychosis? Would it help to write out your experience that they can read at the beginning of session?

    • Izzybee

      778d

      I understand I have the same reaction when it comes to opening up and it takes time to build that relationship up to where your comfortable enough to open up. Maybe you could write it on a note and give it to her I’ve done that before, or even reading her your post maybe that’ll help be a conversation starter. It can be hard opening up when you haven’t in a long time or you don’t know how and you acknowledging that is a big first step for you. I believe in you and I understand how hard it can be. I’m rooting for you friend ❤️

    • Peaches

      778d

      I have the same issues when it comes to talking about what’s really wrong with me at times and even with my therapist I’m like that. However my therapist tried an exercise that made me draw a monster that can somehow connect to me and it was like he read me like a book out of my drawing! I was so shocked but it can be easier to write down or draw how you feel then to speak it so that’s what I do to reach out.

    • TreePerson

      778d

      Delusions are real to you and can be very scary. It’s totally valid ❤️

    • Hb1989

      778d

      As a therapist my advice is to start off by saying exactly what you expressed in your post...."so I've been noticing that I tend to freeze up and say everything is fine. In all honesty though, I've been struggling and don't always know how to put my experience into words." Let your therapist guide you from there. Chances are they can sense youve been holding back and will see this as really positive breakthrough. Do they know you have a history of psychosis? Would it help to write out your experience that they can read at the beginning of session?

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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