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Toots_Magee

672d

How do I keep up my normal pace at work without my body being in extreme pain all the time?

Top reply
    • PEPhoenix

      671d

      I agree with everything that has been said. But just wanted to add, sometimes advocacy is our best tool. I recently asked for help for the first time in the ten years I've been working. I went to HR and asked how I could go about getting accommodations. Every workplace has to legally provide reasonable accommodations for those with disabilities. I have asked for them before at college, but have always been to embarrassed or ashamed to ask for help at work. Im too hard on myself and didn't want to be discriminated against, but I was suffering so much that I mustered up the courage to do so. So I did, and I am so happy for it! I now, with a note from my doctor, have a standing desk and am able to use when I am in pain and need to switch positions. I also have a heating pad and blanket and complete tasks throughout the day based on what my body can realistically do. For example if I have a large stack of filing I may do it in the morning as I am in more pain in the afternoon. I don't not do it-just in a way that I can. Or if I can't lift my arms that day, it will wait for tomorrow and I'll complete other tasks that don't require lifting/arm strengths. Sometimes if you're able or willing to explain to hr, there are ways to complete job tasks in a way that's realistic and doesn't trigger more symptoms/pain. I even have said, I can do this strenuous task, but may pay for it and need to do less strenuous tasks tomorrow and the next day. Being very frank about what my body is able to perform, so that my boss can understand. But I've gotten to a point where I can't keep suffering for a job, so I have to put myself first and if others have something to say thats their issue. I would start by identifying triggers and possible solutions to ask about. Good luck to you. ❤️

    • TTime

      671d

      Pls read my bio, might help

    • PEPhoenix

      671d

      I agree with everything that has been said. But just wanted to add, sometimes advocacy is our best tool. I recently asked for help for the first time in the ten years I've been working. I went to HR and asked how I could go about getting accommodations. Every workplace has to legally provide reasonable accommodations for those with disabilities. I have asked for them before at college, but have always been to embarrassed or ashamed to ask for help at work. Im too hard on myself and didn't want to be discriminated against, but I was suffering so much that I mustered up the courage to do so. So I did, and I am so happy for it! I now, with a note from my doctor, have a standing desk and am able to use when I am in pain and need to switch positions. I also have a heating pad and blanket and complete tasks throughout the day based on what my body can realistically do. For example if I have a large stack of filing I may do it in the morning as I am in more pain in the afternoon. I don't not do it-just in a way that I can. Or if I can't lift my arms that day, it will wait for tomorrow and I'll complete other tasks that don't require lifting/arm strengths. Sometimes if you're able or willing to explain to hr, there are ways to complete job tasks in a way that's realistic and doesn't trigger more symptoms/pain. I even have said, I can do this strenuous task, but may pay for it and need to do less strenuous tasks tomorrow and the next day. Being very frank about what my body is able to perform, so that my boss can understand. But I've gotten to a point where I can't keep suffering for a job, so I have to put myself first and if others have something to say thats their issue. I would start by identifying triggers and possible solutions to ask about. Good luck to you. ❤️

    • MatchaBunn

      672d

      Your normal pace might look different every day, so it’s important to listen to your body and determine what needs you have. Can you do another type of work when you’re having a pain flare? Or take more breaks? If you have access to someone within your work who can help determine accommodations you might need, that’s a great step to manage your pain. Ultimately, it’s more important to take care of your health, because you can’t keep pushing yourself to the point of extreme pain. It’s just not sustainable, but there are things you can do to mitigate pain while you sort out adjusting your workload. Having a good routine of self-care after work, like using Epsom salts to soak, gentle stretching, and/or using a cream to target areas of pain. Stretching breaks in general are a good idea, before, during, and after you’re working. You can also try elevating your feet after work to take some of the pressure off. These are all based on things I do, but if you have more specific pain needs, there could be other options for you!

    • Doglover25006

      672d

      Start slow and gradually build up to your desired level of activity. Find ways to make things easier. There are multiple ways to do the same thing. It’s okay to adapt things to your needs.

    • Elise_Laura

      672d

      Maybe start advocating for yourself. What do you do for work?

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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