Oarkid

484d

I’m here because I couldn’t find any useful information about late diagnosed autism online. Struggling a lot to get out of this burn out period. What I really need help with are any tip on making eating easier. It’s nearly impossible to get myself to want to eat anything, sensory issues while I eat. I feel stupid because I feel like I’m just letting myself starve incapable of eating the food right in front of me. It’s also worth mentioning that my appetite significantly worsened after getting COVID a few months ago. This was a problem for me before that but has gotten unmanageable for me after that happened because I can no longer rely on the food I used to be able to eat easily.

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Top reply
    • beingnotseeming

      482d

      As a general advice I’d say try and find some foods that are consistent in texture and taste. This might mean you’re eating more processed food but food is food and it’s better to eat than not eat. I’ve also found smoothies to be one of the easiest ways for me to eat. Drinking takes less effort for me and that honestly makes a difference. If you have the time and resources to do meal prep that also can be helpful. I know I skip out on eating because I don’t feel like making anything sometimes. Snacking is my other recommendation. Sometimes a meal is just to much to manage or eat but at least consuming something is better than nothing.

    • SunInAugust

      484d

      I'm commenting to get some tips, too. Friends started bringing my food and i struggle to eat that, too. Its somehow so difficult and I'm not wanting to not eat I'm just not

    • Magpi

      484d

      A few options that have worked for me in the past two rely on letting my subconscious take care of things. One: I make a smoothie with flavors I like (chocolate peanut butter and banana are my current favorite) and have it next to me with a straw while I'm doing other things and I will usually just drink it at some point because it's there. Two: a make up a plate of safe foods. Cheese slices, grapes, a handful of cereal, some m&ms whatever it is isn't important just a collection of things I know are ok for my brain and again keep it on hand and I will snack in it with out thinking. Also I when I'm really struggling I will mentally "try" foods. I imagine eating french fries and see how I respond, or mashed potatoes, or cheese and apples and I go through things basically one dish at a time until I find something anything it doesn't have to be a "Meal" that I can eat. And if a dish is a no because of one aspect maybe I can change that aspect to make it ok. Like maybe carrots with ranch sounds good but the texture of the carrots is a no, would cooking the carrots to change their texture help? Boiled carrots and ranch or roasted carrots and ranch are great options. Or chicken nuggets sounds good the breading is a problem. You can get premade grilled chicken strips and eat them like unbreaded nuggets. Etc. Food is fuel and there is not a wrong way to fuel yourself.

      • SunInAugust

        484d

        @Magpi thank you for typing this

    • TayTayLove

      484d

      Its easier for me to eat cold foods, smooth foods, smoothies yogurt, cheese, stuff like that, cheese sandwiches

    • TayTayLove

      484d

      And cereal

    • GracefulKim

      484d

      For me, also late in life autism diagnosis, it comes down to two things: 1) my mental and physical energy amounts at that moment 2) the willingness to do all the steps to cook and 3) if the product I'm considering is worth the result -so say I have ice cream in the freezer. Oh wait. That's already gone. So I don't buy it that often because it'll be the first thing I'll eat. -so I have tortillas and my favorite cheese. It's quick, easy and yummy. Just throw it on the griddle pan thing (the one I leave out on top of the stove) and within two minutes I have something satisfying (I also add chicken and other stuff as I have available) Tacos: soft tacos are quick and easy. I like to dice up tomatoes once I buy them and leave them in a baggie in the fridge so when I need them they're ready. (I do the same with mushrooms, onions, olives, anything I might think is a chore to chop up later: which is everything but cabbage and squash because they don't survive in baggies well) Oh I put a few paper towels in all my baggies. When the paper towel is wet I change it. This let's the produce last way longer. I always "shop" my refrigerator. Since I often forget what I have I explore first then discover combinations that will please me at that moment. That's how I eat healthy. I don't buy the candy I want, I but the ones I don't like much, that way I only eat a little and it lasts a long time. Once in awhile, after almost starving for a couple weeks, I eat two meals in a row. (I used to eat all day once in awhile) I learned to make huge mental notes that I'm full now. Last week I ate my full of watermelon. I clearly noticed I was full and made my normal internal announcement. A few minutes later I found myself eating something else, feeling hungry again. So when I got full the second time I made sure not to look at any more food. I clearly and loudly told myself that I've been full twice in a row now and I'm simply not eating anything else I was able to settle down for the rest of the evening content that I didn't need food.

      • GracefulKim

        484d

        @GracefulKim *sorry while I was typing I broke the first one into two... So in my head there were two things because 1 & 2 we're combined. So yes I listed 3 but said two

    • GracefulKim

      484d

      It might also help to break down the steps to cook and put them on flash cards. As you finish each step you get a new card that has the next step. Flash cards for making macaroni and cheese: * Make sure you have all the ingredients and tools needed. Make sure they are clean and ready to use. Remember the box of Mac n cheese, butter, milk, salt, pot, measuring cup, big spoon to stir it all with, colander, timer, bowl and spoon to eat it with * Put the water in the pot. Turn the heat under the pot to 6 and set the timer for ten minutes, start the timer * Check that the water is boiling (If no, set the timer for another 3 minutes until it boils) * Carefully Add the noodles to the boiling water and stir. Set the timer for 7 minutes, start the timer * Check if the noodles are done. (If not let them cook for one additional minute at a time until they are done) * Drain the noodles into the colander the pot the noodles back into the pot * Add the butter, store until completely melted * Add the milk and stir. Add the cheese powder and stir until evenly coated and smooth. * Put into the bowl(s), rince the pot, put mixing spoon and measuring cup into pot. Enjoy your cheesy noodles

    • GracefulKim

      484d

      It's not overwhelming when it's broken down into simple steps. It's helpful to have each step on one card because you can read it, know that you can do that one thing, and you'll be more encouraged to do the next 'one thing'

    • TayTayLove

      484d

      Omigosh so helpful!!

    • beingnotseeming

      482d

      As a general advice I’d say try and find some foods that are consistent in texture and taste. This might mean you’re eating more processed food but food is food and it’s better to eat than not eat. I’ve also found smoothies to be one of the easiest ways for me to eat. Drinking takes less effort for me and that honestly makes a difference. If you have the time and resources to do meal prep that also can be helpful. I know I skip out on eating because I don’t feel like making anything sometimes. Snacking is my other recommendation. Sometimes a meal is just to much to manage or eat but at least consuming something is better than nothing.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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