See Alike in...

Alike App

Browser

Pisforpotato

624d

So I shared with a close friend that I have Bipolar 2 and she looked at me very oddly. After staring at me with her brows and eyes squinted, she finally said, “you don’t have bipolar disorder. I’ve seen it. You don’t have that.” And I just looked at her in silence. Completely taken aback. Offended. I responded, “well of course you don’t think so. I’m medicated now?” And she just sort of rolled her eyes and walked off. Like, I’m not trying to make myself this way for attention or whatever? You think I want to be this way?? Can anyone relate?

Top reply
    • Chickychick

      608d

      My best friend was shocked when she found out I was bipolar. But she also witnessed some of my mania so she believed it. Others I have told though I’ve received a similar reaction. Ever since being diagnosed I have seen people try to end the stigma on mental health. That’s all we can hope for.

    • Chickychick

      608d

      My best friend was shocked when she found out I was bipolar. But she also witnessed some of my mania so she believed it. Others I have told though I’ve received a similar reaction. Ever since being diagnosed I have seen people try to end the stigma on mental health. That’s all we can hope for.

    • DitsyDiabetic

      608d

      Just came here to say i wouldn’t be friends with anybody that invalidates me like that. People who do that end up causing more harm then good. If you need better friends, I’m sure anybody who commented on this post (myself included) would love to talk to you. 😇 Final thought - your friend would change her mind if she witnessed an episode. And if she was really your friend, she’d stick by you though it.

    • Pisforpotato

      608d

      So I just wanted to answer everyone collectively, but thank you all for your input, your encouragement, and you kindness. It is so nice to know that I am I a community that is so willing to help and just make me feel better. I am so thankful to all of you🙂

    • canoli

      616d

      I lost almost all my friends and 3 of my kids because they didn't like my behavior. I was obviously ill, I went to a psychiatrist and started therapy right away. I work so hard on myself but it didn't matter. They understand that I'm ill but don't feel like that's an excuse. Like, mental illness is no excuse to act crazy. So stupid and I was so traumatized that I developed very bad ptsd on top of the bipolar. I refuse to spend time with people that treat me that way. If they don't like me and are willfully ignorant about my condition I'm good without them. I made other friends who recognize the difference between a mental health episode and being a bad person.

    • Stummie

      618d

      I am sorry you had to go through this. I've been diagnosed with BP for 17+years there is no liner line of who is or isn't. "Ignorance is bliss" isn't the answer. I hope you and your circle can find common ground and a supportive healthy way to communicate. There is life beyond a diagnosis. And a crucial part for me in learning and accepting myself was learning to change the tone of how I talk about my condition. I use to use statements like "I AM BP". With therapy and help with medical professionals. I learned "I HAVE BP". I also realized correcting other verbage about me in a loving way helped me develop good relationships with friends and family. "Communication is key" goes the saying. And that's true when we as people cultivate a atmosphere of truth/facts, love not hate, peace, joy, support, and acceptance. Life becomes a whole lot more enjoyable even in the hardships. So my last closing words to you @Pisforpotato. Find comfort in knowing you aren't alone, and peace in the process! With ☮️ to you. Stummie

    • dysturbation

      618d

      My mom basically does this with my ADHD. She doesn't believe I have it no matter how much evidence I give her and she acts like I'm being a hypochondriac if I bring it up

    • lumiswrld

      618d

      yes yes yes i can relate. at first, getting my diagnosis my mother straight up told me i didn’t have it . following months , i was in a depressive episode & had stopped telling people my diagnosis was bipolar even though it was. it can be so invalidating & ass & honestly can worsen a condition im sure.

    • saculnairda

      618d

      I can relate. Ive heard voices for years and people love to put me down for it and cast m off aside. The only thing i can say is if she doesnt respect you, theres no reason to continue. Some people are best to let go. Also, ask her for her PHD documentation next time she wants to diagnose someone.

    • Tuxie125

      623d

      For the most part I love being able to talk to my friends about my bipolar side effects (usually bad jokes they don’t fully get). Unfortunately there r just some people that shouldn’t know and sometimes u don’t know that until after U’ve told them. I told my best friend and she was fine then one day she gave me a long loud lecture on what I should be doing for my bipolar and such infront of our coworkers. So we got in a small fight and for over 6 months I politely didn’t tell her anything to do with my mental health. Eventually she came around but not everyone will. I’m never telling my grandmother, I love her but she will Never understand

    • Helvetiquette

      624d

      This unfortunately happens too often. People think they know what bipolar looks like when they don’t. They assume just because you’re in control that it’s not there. They don’t recognize or validate the struggle it takes to keep it managed or masked. I also struggle with people idolizing my mania. And pointing to that being the good side of me, when in reality it causes more harm than good.

      • Pisforpotato

        624d

        @Helvetiquette YES. THIS. Everything you said makes up most of my interactions with people that I think I can safely disclose to. My mania is a roller coaster, and others have noticed, but of course, they use all the good words. I’m so productive, so alert, so happy, so excitable, so authoritative, blah blah. In reality, I am quite literally spiraling in my own head. You just can’t see it, fortunately for you.

        • Helvetiquette

          624d

          @Pisforpotato one of my worst breakdowns came after my diagnosis when one of my best friends and fiancé at the time said they didn’t believe it. That I had it too together for that to be the case. Then almost out of spite and fueled by new medications I started cycling and basically proving how bipolar I was. My relationship didn’t survive (dodged a bullet there) and my friend eventually came around and apologized. It’s possible to move on from this dynamic, but I wouldn’t recommend the way I did it 😂

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Want to chat or share? Download the Alike app now and get complete access to Alike.health's unique features.

Find people who are
experiencing a similar
medical reality

100% Free
100%
Free

Download Alike for the full experience

JOIN

View All

Bupropion

night sweats

paranoid

Valium

sertraline

palpitations

Anxiety (Including GAD)

Depression

palpitations

Depression

Valium

Bupropion