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Marcaroni

658d

Can anyone with cognitive issues (executive functioning, brain fog, Chiari malformation, and anxiety or panic disorders) relate with struggling to drive? I’m 17 and I have my permit and failed my first test. I’ve always been a very safe driver so I guess that says something, but some days I feel like I’m so foggy-headed and I make the dumbest mistakes. Academically I’m very smart, but for some reason driving (paying attention to several things at once, remembering steps to a maneuver on a test, hand/foot coordination, and even just managing anxiety) I really struggle with. Hope this makes sense. how does your disability effect your ability to drive and how do you manage?

Top reply
    • MatchaBunn

      609d

      I’ve had these problems with driving in particular for a long time, and it has led me to the decision to wait and find other modes of transportation. Since discovering I’m autistic and ADHD, along with having brain fog from fibro, I’ve been able to be a lot kinder to myself. I realize it’s not “just anxiety” that can be changed by hearing it’s “not that bad”. I think that taking your needs seriously is important, because you care about the safety and yourself and others. Being honest about where you’re at, and taking more time to regulate when you need to, are both ways you can check-in with yourself while driving. It’s valid to be anxious when things aren’t working like they usually do, and there’s nothing wrong with stepping back and taking a break from driving if it is causing undue stress. If there are things that help you concentrate in other areas of your life, you can try to apply them here as well. Sometimes singing along to music can help give your mind and body a place to get out that anxious energy, but I know that is not always safe/accessible when driving. Keeping soothing items in your car can also help create more comfort, and help you feel more relaxed, to start out in a good head space. And if you can, letting other people in the car know what you struggle with can create another line of support. They can verbally talk you through steps, or just be there to listen to you verbally go through the steps. Sometimes getting the thoughts outside of ourselves can create a better understanding and organization. It may help with memory, as well, to externalize and further drive in the procedures and placements.

    • MatchaBunn

      609d

      I’ve had these problems with driving in particular for a long time, and it has led me to the decision to wait and find other modes of transportation. Since discovering I’m autistic and ADHD, along with having brain fog from fibro, I’ve been able to be a lot kinder to myself. I realize it’s not “just anxiety” that can be changed by hearing it’s “not that bad”. I think that taking your needs seriously is important, because you care about the safety and yourself and others. Being honest about where you’re at, and taking more time to regulate when you need to, are both ways you can check-in with yourself while driving. It’s valid to be anxious when things aren’t working like they usually do, and there’s nothing wrong with stepping back and taking a break from driving if it is causing undue stress. If there are things that help you concentrate in other areas of your life, you can try to apply them here as well. Sometimes singing along to music can help give your mind and body a place to get out that anxious energy, but I know that is not always safe/accessible when driving. Keeping soothing items in your car can also help create more comfort, and help you feel more relaxed, to start out in a good head space. And if you can, letting other people in the car know what you struggle with can create another line of support. They can verbally talk you through steps, or just be there to listen to you verbally go through the steps. Sometimes getting the thoughts outside of ourselves can create a better understanding and organization. It may help with memory, as well, to externalize and further drive in the procedures and placements.

    • Pinknihari

      609d

      I have the same exact issue as you 😭

    • T02

      658d

      It took me a very long time to get accustomed to driving, and i was TERRIFIED of it for the longest time. I got my first license at 19 and thus began my journey of constantly panicking and thinking id never make it. The second i started driving alone, i was COMPLETLY fine. Barely any mistakes, relaxed, in control and found it as easy as melting butter If you havent gotten the opportunity to yet, try it on your own in backroads. Maybe youll find its surprisingly easy without someone to care after other than yourself?

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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