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Automatic

310d

Why have my motor skills decreased so much? I've noticed the decreased motor skills range from fine motor skills (dropping things more often) to larger ones (struggling to walk.) I can only guess its related to my ASD, as I'm struggling with burnout. Any Ideas?

Top reply
    • mobilityaidbabe

      310d

      @Automatic Definitely talk to a trusted and established doctor who understands your experiences, for me it was my physical therapist. Choosing an aid (or multiple for good/bad days) definitely depends on the specific challenges you have. For me, I have POTS with syncope so a wheelchair is safest when I'm traveling a lot of having a flare up. I use a rolator for short trips and when I'm around and about the house for a quick-sit option. I don't have personal experience with canes but I know their main purpose is for stability and balance. I know little about crutches. There are multiple types of all of these and it depends on how you need them to work for you. Once you figure out what you need, a prescription will likely get one or more mobility aid covered my insurance if you have it, depending on your specific circumstances. Another great option is second-hand medical stores. They often have lightly used equipment for a fraction of the price of a new aid. Pro tip 1: if insurance will cover a cane OR a walker but not both, for example, let insurance cover the more expensive walker and spend a lot less on a second-hand cane. Pro tip 2: you can call your insurance directly for all the information about what they will and won't cover depending on diagnoses, experience, symptoms, and prescriptions. Mine sent me a PDF with all the requirements and red tape so I could make sure they paid for everything according to policy. Feel free to message me directly if you want to talk more in depth about it 💕

    • mobilityaidbabe

      310d

      I am having the same experience. For me, ASD burnout resulted in a new inability to ignore symptoms of underlying chronic illnesses and an almost immediate dependency on mobility aids seemingly "out of nowhere." Many things have changed for me suddenly, such as skill regression, memory loss, and even things like my handwriting and appetite.

      • Automatic

        310d

        @mobilityaidbabe That seems pretty similar to what I'm struggling with. Any advice on mobility aids? Like where to get them, how to choose which is most appropriate, and what is available for different issues, etc?

        • mobilityaidbabe

          310d

          @Automatic Definitely talk to a trusted and established doctor who understands your experiences, for me it was my physical therapist. Choosing an aid (or multiple for good/bad days) definitely depends on the specific challenges you have. For me, I have POTS with syncope so a wheelchair is safest when I'm traveling a lot of having a flare up. I use a rolator for short trips and when I'm around and about the house for a quick-sit option. I don't have personal experience with canes but I know their main purpose is for stability and balance. I know little about crutches. There are multiple types of all of these and it depends on how you need them to work for you. Once you figure out what you need, a prescription will likely get one or more mobility aid covered my insurance if you have it, depending on your specific circumstances. Another great option is second-hand medical stores. They often have lightly used equipment for a fraction of the price of a new aid. Pro tip 1: if insurance will cover a cane OR a walker but not both, for example, let insurance cover the more expensive walker and spend a lot less on a second-hand cane. Pro tip 2: you can call your insurance directly for all the information about what they will and won't cover depending on diagnoses, experience, symptoms, and prescriptions. Mine sent me a PDF with all the requirements and red tape so I could make sure they paid for everything according to policy. Feel free to message me directly if you want to talk more in depth about it 💕

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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"Autism affects your nervous system so it does have physical symptoms including a decrease in motor skills. Speech impediments and other language skill delays are also common in people with autism and both can get worse when your needs aren't taken care of. Autism also can affect your ability to feel things the way people typically do because it affects your introspection."

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