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JustRachelle

521d

I was discussing getting a service dog with my husband and my dad overheard the conversation and said “you don’t need a service dog” … this is like his 3rd time saying that to me when he has overheard me speak of it. My thing is what makes him feel like he knows what I need. He’s never been to a doctors appointment with me.. never ONCE researched any of my illnesses but have the nerve to tell me what I need or don’t need. It just aggravates me because I’m trying my hardest to deal with and accept all of this shit happening to me and I’ve been going through HELL with my health since I was 23 years old! That’s 7 years!!

Top reply
    • italianxpeaches

      521d

      Speak up for yourself. Tell him you think you do need one and explain to him why. And if he interrupts you, write him a letter and give it to him (this used to be the ONLY way me and my mom could communicate without interruptions, yelling or arguing) and if he chooses to not read it or whatever, that is on him and you tried all you could. He has to live with narrow mindedness. You can also explain in the letter service dogs are used for many things, even mental issues, not just heavily physical handicaps. I had a dog for 15 years, he was never trained or registered but he trained himself to be my service dog I'd like to think. He was always in tune to my emotions and sickness. He knew I was going to be heavily upset before I did so he would always come running to me to calm me down and he would always stick by me when he knew I wasn't feeling well. He was an amazing dog. The best I've ever had and I've had a few in my life. I wish he was still here now to get me through my health struggles and mental struggles. So yes I think a service dog would aid you in whatever you need one for.

    • EncyclopediaFae

      521d

      I feel like it helps to explain what a POTS alert dog does. Most people hear service dog and don’t really understand that there are dogs others than guide dogs and psychiatric service dogs. Explaining that they are able to detect a POTs attack and performing DPT made a world of difference when explaining it to my mother. I have low blood pressure issues in addition to my POTs that makes it slightly different and I rarely fully faint (I’ll collapse and vomit or have an impossible struggle to stay awake) but getting a dog has become my top priority because I’ve taught my pet dog DPT after I first learned about it and I was SHOCKED at how effective it was. I’m very much a homebody because POTs makes going anywhere exhausting and having the ability for both extra stability when I get dizzy, lightheaded or my vision starts to go and then be able to help me rapidly reduce my heart rate when it spikes is going to change my life. I even saw one girl on YouTube whose POTs dog helps her with her laundry and that’s going to be another big game changer for me as going from a top loading washer to a front load dryer and getting things off shelves makes my laundry room the most likely room in my house for me to have an episode. Explaining the hows and whys and how it’ll change things might make a difference

    • italianxpeaches

      521d

      Speak up for yourself. Tell him you think you do need one and explain to him why. And if he interrupts you, write him a letter and give it to him (this used to be the ONLY way me and my mom could communicate without interruptions, yelling or arguing) and if he chooses to not read it or whatever, that is on him and you tried all you could. He has to live with narrow mindedness. You can also explain in the letter service dogs are used for many things, even mental issues, not just heavily physical handicaps. I had a dog for 15 years, he was never trained or registered but he trained himself to be my service dog I'd like to think. He was always in tune to my emotions and sickness. He knew I was going to be heavily upset before I did so he would always come running to me to calm me down and he would always stick by me when he knew I wasn't feeling well. He was an amazing dog. The best I've ever had and I've had a few in my life. I wish he was still here now to get me through my health struggles and mental struggles. So yes I think a service dog would aid you in whatever you need one for.

      • EncyclopediaFae

        521d

        @italianxpeaches just fyi there is no registry in the US. Not sure where either of you live but thought I’d throw this out here because in the States at least registries are a scam and widely contribute to the rise in fake service dogs

        • italianxpeaches

          521d

          @EncyclopediaFae I'am in the US yes. I think what I mean is have him registered as an emotional support animal. Aren't they two separate things? Where as you can invest into a service dog that has been properly trained for it's duties and cost a significant amount of money and is trained to ignore the outside world, as well as be allowed in public places but the emotional support animal cannot be allowed in public places as it's not properly trained for public settings and to ignore these situations it's put in? But at home it might have certain privileges like landlords not charging a pet deposit. I know where I live, if you have a doctor or psychiatrist write out that you need this animal for therapy or emotional support, they won't charge you a pet deposit.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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