Artistgirl

503d

How can I combat fatigue so I can do all the things I want to do?

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Top reply
    • BoneDustWoman

      18d

      Like others have said, I've had to let go of the idea of being able to do all the things I want to do. I focus on doing the things I need to do first, and then evaluate which of my "wants," if any, is possible for me to do beyond that. I have a partner now who has been a huge help in managing the household and helping me with my kids, and that's made a huge difference in my health. I go to bed early (around 8, when possible), I avoid gluten, and I take short breaks throughout the day when I can. I've also been taking Diclofenac, a prescription NSAID, since May, which has had a huge positive impact on controlling the systemic inflammation that contributes to my fatigue. Even with all of that, I still can't exercise at all (I used to run 3-4x a week), or go hiking/swimming for fun, and most of my days off are spent in bed to recover. It's just something I've had to accept, which is not always easy 😋 Just remember that you have to answer your body's needs first.

    • Lunas_Mom

      503d

      If only… 😓😥 Fatigue is relentless. I have had to learn to scale back my expectations to better reflect what energy I actually have on any given day. “Resting up” doesn’t seem to have any real impact anymore. I’m good for 2-3 hrs out and about before I “hit the wall” and need to retreat to recharge. Wishing you all the best.

    • Artistgirl

      503d

      👍

    • Kira_Elyse

      497d

      We hear from people that we “just have to live with it” or “make the best of it” and while that message is borderline gaslighting, there is some merit to the idea of reframing the goal of “doing all the things I want to do”. Sometimes our bodies don’t cooperate with that, and it can be valuable to pause and evaluate what is most important. Our fatigue is exacerbated by strenuous activity, and fighting fatigue is a strenuous activity. Focus on energizing and nourishing things. Nature? Positive relationships? Your art? Try to cultivate those and trim out unnecessary stresses. That’s my advice 🤷‍♀️

    • PEMprincess

      487d

      Yes I’d say pick your to die for favs that are not just thrilling and fun- but actually fulfill you and speak to your soul. Then I’d set out a small increment of time to do it everyday (or 5 days out the week whatever works for you, but I aim high so that if I must miss a day or a few I’ve still got a bunch of other days left and I don’t feel so bad about it in the grand scheme of a week or month) so for ex, if I love to dance I’d set a 5-10 minute timer to do my favorite move or light routine every day so my brain can keep my identity as a dancer. Over time one can adjust, add or subtract, and find their limit and healthy routine.I still struggle with the feeling of “loss” of my identity or life before I fell Ill. What allows me to cope is knowing that my body is just trying to protect me, I need special care because my body is special, and sometimes I have to slow down so I won’t shut down and can get back up and at em in no time.

    • PEMprincess

      487d

      We are pioneering a way of life that no one person has figured out how to cure or adequately treat. We have not disappeared, we are not watching “normal” life from the sidelines while we only get to suffer as it can so often seem or feel- We are just defining a NEW normal! That new normal CAN be beautiful. Remember it takes time, so be patient with yourself, and limit outside noise from those around you. Stress is a waste of our precious time & energy too, and any one of those people wouldn’t know the half of what it takes to be you! Easier said than done of course, but I’m proud of your resilience and I hope something I’ve said helps💝💝💝 happy healing!

    • sissy2802

      358d

      My experience with chronic fatigue is that you can't fight it. I have to listen to my body. When the fatigue gets so bad I rest. I also watch my attitude. If I let my attitude get bad everything gets worse. Attitude is key. Sometimes you just have to accept things in life and work around it.

    • leify22

      27d

      Commenting because I want to see everyone's advice

    • 55isMe

      27d

      Try smaller battles. 5 minutes at a time, if needed. Maybe in a couple weeks, you'll be up to 7 minutes.

    • BoneDustWoman

      18d

      Like others have said, I've had to let go of the idea of being able to do all the things I want to do. I focus on doing the things I need to do first, and then evaluate which of my "wants," if any, is possible for me to do beyond that. I have a partner now who has been a huge help in managing the household and helping me with my kids, and that's made a huge difference in my health. I go to bed early (around 8, when possible), I avoid gluten, and I take short breaks throughout the day when I can. I've also been taking Diclofenac, a prescription NSAID, since May, which has had a huge positive impact on controlling the systemic inflammation that contributes to my fatigue. Even with all of that, I still can't exercise at all (I used to run 3-4x a week), or go hiking/swimming for fun, and most of my days off are spent in bed to recover. It's just something I've had to accept, which is not always easy 😋 Just remember that you have to answer your body's needs first.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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