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Binx89

707d

I have a 7 year old daughter with Autism. She wasn't verbal until she was 4. Now she talks like she never had a problem. However all the sudden she has back slid into where she still talks ok, but almost whispers and mumbles. when asked to speak up she gets VERY upset. 😔 We have dealt with this struggle in the past, but jot since. Should I be worried she will degress more?

Top reply
    • SunInAugust

      702d

      I agree. Give her some nonverbal options. It sounds like so wants to connect with you and be heard and understood! Lots of autistic people like AAC or sign language to communicate.

    • SunInAugust

      702d

      I agree. Give her some nonverbal options. It sounds like so wants to connect with you and be heard and understood! Lots of autistic people like AAC or sign language to communicate.

    • Katty

      703d

      What I hear is: she’s talking because she wants to communicate. That doesn’t mean it’s her preferred method and that she wouldn’t appreciate options. If whispering truly is her preferred form of communication: great, but we don’t know that yet. I would REALLY recommend working in nonverbal communication options for her.

    • Binx89

      703d

      So I have read alot of don't make her talk and I just want to understand. Because she talks and ALOT!! She is just below a whisper alot of the time and she gets SO upset when she can't be heard. So sane advice? I just what to do right by her and we are waiting to get in/o therapy.

    • SunInAugust

      706d

      If you scroll the autism posts here a little more there are lots of aymutidtics affirming the benefits of being nonverbal for their wellbeing and how they prefer to communicate

    • SunInAugust

      706d

      Its not a degress. It's not black sliding. Its very very very important to rethink your perspective on this. Its a difference in communication. Verbal communication is not superior and trying to get an autistic person who is currently nonverbal to become verbal is like asking someone to speak French who doesn't know it - even if she desperately wanted to please you and make you happy and do the thing she can't and not meeting your needs from her or sensing her frustrstion will live with her. Id highly suggest supplementing her verbal communication with AAC or other forms of nonverbal communication. Loads of nonverbal autistics have so much to say and also really gravitate towards sign language! Give her more tools to "talk" and she will thrive and be heard and be able to connect and communicate with you even more. Please please please, she just needs difference access to talking. Its not a degrees, not at all.

      • SunInAugust

        706d

        @SunInAugust When I was diagnosis as autistic I had to reevaluate my own internalized ablism. I thought verbal communication was best. If we believe verbal communication is the gold standard, we are also saying things about deaf people that aren't true. I've become a lot more inclusive, tolerant, and educated. Me typing a not on my phone to pass to a friend when the envionment is too overwhelming for me to find words has never been poorly received. They are always helpful and respond the same as if I had spoken the words outloud. Its all communication, there are so many ways to connect and be heard and understood

        • SunInAugust

          706d

          @SunInAugust Also, I'm 29 with a masters degree and my own apt. Just paid off my first car. Autistic people can thrive when they have the right tools. Please feel free to message me!

    • Katty

      707d

      I would do everything you can to not push verbal communication. Let her speak if she wants to, but let it be a choice. There are many ways to communicate (such as AAC which was already mentioned). Putting the emphasis on communication (instead of just verbal communication) and adding nonverbal systems into her tool box will allow her to continue to grow and express her self in a way that works for her. It also may allow her to be mixed verbal (alternate between verbal and nonverbal depending on circumstances).

    • Binx89

      707d

      But absolutely I show her understanding when we struggle, not punishment, annoyance, or anything of rhe sorts.

    • Binx89

      707d

      What is AAC? I am not familiar...

      • wise

        707d

        @Binx89 AAC stands for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. It usually involves an electronic device similar to an iPad that has lists of commonly used words with or without associated pictures, but it's also customizable in that you can add specific words or your daughter can type out what she's trying to say. Even just a picture board or writing in a notebook is a form of AAC. It's about giving nonverbal people as much control as possible in how and what they communicate. I understand YOU may not be reacting adversely, but if she goes to public school, it's paramount that her teachers understand they can't react negatively either. You may need to homeschool her if school becomes too stressful, but there are plenty of resources for homeschooling parents and even homeschooling groups so your child doesn't fall behind in their social development

    • wise

      707d

      If you haven't already, get her an AAC device so she still feels in control of her communication. If it's that upsetting, stop asking her to speak up and encourage her to use AAC instead. She may be regressing because she's going through something stressful you may or may not know about. If she goes to school, meet with her teachers to update them and work out a plan for how to make sure she still feels safe and comfortable at school. Regardless of how much she regresses, she's still your daughter and still deserves love and attention, not admonishment for not talking or not being "normal enough" or anything else that's ultimately out of her control. This is also important for her teachers to understand: regression is not a conscious choice and is completely out of her control. She's 7, she's not a grown adult who's acting out maliciously, she's just acting like an autistic kid

    • ToeKnee

      707d

      Or sounds like she's unsure of herself but I'm no expert in verbal communication in children with autism.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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