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HouseHippoMom

604d

I'm having trouble finding a place to diagnose me with ASD (I feel very much like an Aspie though saying this is considered taboo or offensive today) if this helps to relate in any way... where do I go what should I do to get evaluated or tested. As I have already shown many markers on an autism test online sorry am not sure which one but it was an official site to help share the results with whomever needs to see them. It was mainly to show I have the markers for it; and I never been diagnosed in my childhood which would have made a huge difference back then... so I wanted to have proof that I'm on the ASD and that I'm not making it up and I wouldn't ever do such a thing on such a serious matter as this. It makes a lot of sense for me to have this done and to have proof of it because I have family that doesn't believe me and doctors I see can't do anything to help because they can't diagnose me and as an adult it is even more difficult having more doors closed than opened. It shouldn't bother me but it does, because I wouldn't question anyone if they felt strongly about ASD about themselves and shared with me why they feel connected to it. When I think I found a place that can help I found out they can't and they send me to another place and so on and so on. No one has been able to get me where I need to go. I'll keep looking and trying, same for my child. Who I think is ASD too. I've had teachers and professions say they think she could be an Aspie. I've had her on a list to be seen only to have a year later be told oh we don't take your medical here. Frustrated that's all.

Top reply
    • EatenByWormy

      602d

      @HouseHippoMom Every autistic person is different and everyone’s configuration of autism is different. Don’t think about autism being a spectrum as being somewhere between “more” or “less,” or “high functioning” or “low functioning.” The Aspie Quiz (the name is outdated ik) results are shown on a circular graph, which I find way better. Trying to be understood by allistic (non-autistic) people is a difficult process for us regardless. Choosing to use a term that’s referencing “high” vs “low” functioning isn’t going to make it that much easier. What does make it easier is getting to know yourself, being able to identify your needs and preferences, building confidence in your validity as a person. You’re never going to communicate like an allistic person if you aren’t one, and that’s all there is to that. Also like, saying “labels offend people these days” is not fair. We all identify ourselves in different ways and labels can help people make sense of what they experience- just like what you saw here for yourself. Most times the “offense” is from being MISlabeled. Hearing other people is just as important as being heard.

    • Neuco

      602d

      Asperger's isn't actually a diagnosis anymore. It's not that it "offends people", it's that is inaccurate (it was also named after a nazi, but that's a different story). Autism is a spectrum, different people have a different spectrum of needs. You're more likely to get an accurate diagnosis with the correct language.

      • EatenByWormy

        602d

        @Neuco Got to it before I did, thanks! :)

    • HouseHippoMom

      603d

      When I seen it on America's Next Top Model, I identified with the girl who said she was diagnosed with Asperger's and all the things that went with it for her- it was an aha moment for me and I finally understood why I was so different from my peers and so quiet and observant studying people more than speaking. My communication was extremely awkward and embarrassing because I would get laughed at or confused looks. So I would tend to just keep to myself. I preferred to be alone and get distracted way to easily either there would be a noise that bothered me or not enough noise or too loud in a room so I couldn't do my school work. I would bite my skin on my fingers and use to bite my nails off too but I stopped that and kept it to my skin which I still do all the time. Anyway when I saw that episode I just new that I could finally identify with something (I know labels offend people these days) and to finally not feel so alone. Saying autism isn't a bad thing but I'm still trying to accept that's what it is- aspie is the type of autism on the spectrum I feel comfortable with as people can look info up on it if they want to know more about my quirks and then they will see why it is on the autism spectrum. If I explained it the right way for me, I hope to be understood better.

      • EatenByWormy

        602d

        @HouseHippoMom Every autistic person is different and everyone’s configuration of autism is different. Don’t think about autism being a spectrum as being somewhere between “more” or “less,” or “high functioning” or “low functioning.” The Aspie Quiz (the name is outdated ik) results are shown on a circular graph, which I find way better. Trying to be understood by allistic (non-autistic) people is a difficult process for us regardless. Choosing to use a term that’s referencing “high” vs “low” functioning isn’t going to make it that much easier. What does make it easier is getting to know yourself, being able to identify your needs and preferences, building confidence in your validity as a person. You’re never going to communicate like an allistic person if you aren’t one, and that’s all there is to that. Also like, saying “labels offend people these days” is not fair. We all identify ourselves in different ways and labels can help people make sense of what they experience- just like what you saw here for yourself. Most times the “offense” is from being MISlabeled. Hearing other people is just as important as being heard.

    • EatenByWormy

      604d

      Getting a diagnosis is an arduous and expensive process :( I came across a suggestion to note down the symptoms/behaviors/memories you have that are related, so that’s what I did. Embrace Autism is a fabulous resource, the results from the self evaluations i added to my list at the bottom. You can skip the insurance issues by calling your carrier and having them find you some in-network local docs. Obviously that doesn’t guarantee anything, but at least you won’t have to worry about insurance coverage.

      • EatenByWormy

        604d

        @EatenByWormy I’m still going through the process so definitely understand the frustration. One thing though- why do you prefer Aspie?

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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