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batJAM

920d

How can I learn to better manage my anger? I think it’s usually caused by sensory overstimulation and alexithymia (difficulty identifying or expressing emotions). I’ve been trying self-care and being more aware of my triggers, such as social situations and changes in routine, to hopefully prevent meltdowns. I think I default to anger when overwhelmed because I used to cry so much that it made others uncomfortable, to the point that exes left me for being “too emotional.” So now I’m traumatized, and I express my feelings through verbal aggression and occasionally I have involuntary violent outbursts. I don’t want to be this way. I know I need more therapy, but I was just wondering if anyone has similar experiences.

Top reply
    • nanie

      913d

      I have the same problem dude. It sucks that some partners don't understand

    • nanie

      913d

      I have the same problem dude. It sucks that some partners don't understand

    • Wlwsavage

      918d

      I get angry when over stimulated as well. I often find I either get so angry I become non verbal and if I don’t unwillingly become non verbal I choose to go mute as I find it does help personally. (Also it helps that I don’t say anything in anger to loved ones) Anger sometimes just needs time to fade away but watching a show or listen to music is helpful. Ironically enough listening or watching something more dramatic rather than lighthearted helps me, maybe because it allows me to see anger and deeper feelings be expressed without having to do it myself.

    • lilraingirl

      920d

      I have this happen a lot sometimes I listen to music sometimes I do nothing last night my partner told me to quit my out burst like I could just stop it and I almost self harmed so there is many ways to deal with out bursts both good and bad most important is to talk to a doctor on how to find a healthy way good luck to u 😥🙏

    • batJAM

      920d

      To clarify - I had violent outbursts as a young child as well due to sensory overload, but this behavior has recently resurfaced due to a high-stress life event.

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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