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Notesapppoet

388d

What do you find causes acid reflux flare-ups for you? I've been experiencing it at a much greater frequency the past couple weeks than I have in a long time. In fact, its never made me feel nauseous in this way before, where I'm feeling it somewhat nightly as I'm going to bed. It could be related to other colds/flus I've been around (working with children), but I'm wondering if it's something else. My eating habits have not been different to my awareness (although I'm not great with tracking that)

Top reply
    • Avasha2

      349d

      I have found that my trigger foods, I can sometimes have that item once and be fine, but then not fine having two or more days in a row, or just have a flare up on the first day. My flare ups are coffee, chocolate, alcohol, Pineapple, banana, tomato. So I can have a coffee every so often and be okay, but if I dare try have one a few days in a row, I'm taking the risk. So sometimes it's hard to find your triggers because you'll have it once or twice and be fine, and not think it's a trigger. I used to have an iced coffee every day, with Pineapple in my breakfast and tomato in my sandwich for lunch 5 days a week. When I found out that they were triggers, I understood why I was always so sick.. Try eliminating coffee, alcohol, chocolate, Pineapple and tomato (the basics I was informed of when diagnosed) and if you feel better after not having for a week or two, try have one again for a few days and see how you feel. Try eliminate to find your triggers

    • Avasha2

      349d

      I have found that my trigger foods, I can sometimes have that item once and be fine, but then not fine having two or more days in a row, or just have a flare up on the first day. My flare ups are coffee, chocolate, alcohol, Pineapple, banana, tomato. So I can have a coffee every so often and be okay, but if I dare try have one a few days in a row, I'm taking the risk. So sometimes it's hard to find your triggers because you'll have it once or twice and be fine, and not think it's a trigger. I used to have an iced coffee every day, with Pineapple in my breakfast and tomato in my sandwich for lunch 5 days a week. When I found out that they were triggers, I understood why I was always so sick.. Try eliminating coffee, alcohol, chocolate, Pineapple and tomato (the basics I was informed of when diagnosed) and if you feel better after not having for a week or two, try have one again for a few days and see how you feel. Try eliminate to find your triggers

    • Korbyn

      349d

      I've been working on not doing stomach gripping ;v; I've done it all my life and I didn't know it was causing me so many issues..

    • beitmenotyou

      350d

      When I get in with a cold and have snot, and flem build up

    • Mashka

      383d

      Sorry to ask, if you're a female, have you taken a pregnancy test? Women can still have their cycles while pregnant.

    • shoe

      386d

      Try to avoid things that are high in acidity. For example: coffee, tomatoes, apples/ apple juice.

    • serendi

      386d

      Oh man, I empathize with you so much. I hate hate hate when flare-ups come up and it’s not because I’ve been eating or drinking things that mess with it, etc. This isn’t an answer to your question, but there is one thing I always use for handling flare-ups, especially when I get spikes during them: Mix a little baking soda in water. Make sure it’s all dissolved before you drink it. All it does is lower the pH of your stomach acid for a short time (hence why I mentioned using this during spikes), but the relief from it is beautiful, I swear, and it helps prevent damage to your esophagus. It’s not dangerous to do, either. It tastes kind of… salty? Somehow? My mom prefers to really dilute it to where she can’t taste it, whereas I mix it in a much smaller amount of water and just deal with it for a brief moment. (Drinking a lot of water makes my GERD worse. 😓) If I’m having a frustrating flare-up that won’t go away or meds aren’t helping with enough, I’ll put about a teaspoon in my water bottle (20+ oz) to help keep acid from causing damage or making me too nauseous to function throughout the day.

      • serendi

        386d

        @serendi Also! If you do use it in your water bottle, don’t drink from that while you’re actively eating. After is fine, but you want to make sure that the acid can do its job when the food solids enter your stomach.

        • dolphinblues

          386d

          @serendi This is great advice! I had forgotten that my mom told me about this. She has done it for years and it works great. Especially when she wakes up with it in the middle of the night. I am putting it on a sticky note, and putting it on my mirror. I have been struggling with getting mine back under control after several illnesses requiring antibiotics. There have been several nights spent in my recliner because of it. Question: how do you know it's acting up before it gets so bad that it is hitting your throat?

    • Avasha2

      388d

      I dealt with high nausea for 10 years before being diagnosed with reflux due to damage in my esophagus. I find that my triggers are and not limited to; coffee, chocolate, alcohol, banana, tomato, Pineapple, soft drinks, lollies, greasy and fatty foods. I find I can have a small amount of these items when taking my tablets (the same you mentioned above) but cannot have a lot or go two days in a row of having the same item without needing to sleep sitting up in bed. Limiting those food items, exercising more and being on my tablets daily, I'm not suffering as much. I was given a list of "trigger" foods by my GP, and I soon realised that most did affect me, and I soon realised other items did too and added them to my list. I did find that the more exercise I do and eating healthier, had helped so much more. Best to contact your GP to get their advice and then start eliminating foods that way.

    • TigLyn

      388d

      Have you tried elevating the head area of your bed. Like using a couple of books between the 2 mattresses, it will raise you up just enough so the reflux can't come back up to your esophagus. I had to do this with my son.

      • Notesapppoet

        388d

        @TigLyn oh wow this is a great idea. I've never thought of that!

    • Notesapppoet

      388d

      Follow up question -- if I know it's stress, what do I even do about that? Like what amount of de-stressing must I do and how long will it take for acid reflux to give me a break :'-) do I just start taking omeperazole and call it a day?

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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Some possible causes of acid reflux flare-ups include a hiatal hernia, certain foods and drinks, lying down too soon after eating, and stress. It's important to consult with a doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan tailored to your specific situation.

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