roaring20s

210d

Hello, I’m recently thinking of admitting myself to an inpatient facility as an adult, I’ve been a few times as an adolescent, but nervous to go as an adult. Can anyone tell me things I should be aware of/prepared for? If you have experience with inpatient treatment as a minor + adult, can you list the main differences? Thank you!

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

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  • Sydari

    210d

    I never went as a child. But my most recent one I went in to be put back in medication. I'd say the biggest thing is keep to yourself. Do groups (discussions and activities) to get out sooner or if you think they'd help you. Everything is scheduled including meals. Give yourself time mentally for your meds to adjust and don't let them over-medicate you because they won't hesitate. You can stay in your room if you want, I'd suggest making your bed every morning. And go outside if and when you can to feel the sun.

    • roaring20s

      210d

      thank you so much this is very helpful information to me! Can I ask why you say keep to yourself? That wasn’t an option when I went as a youth, we had to spend all our (patients) time together i guess for close monitoring.

      • Sydari

        210d

        I guess you never know who or how the person is that you're talking to! Best to keep things short and don't share personal information.

  • butterfly39

    210d

    I never went in as a child but I've been in multiple times as an adult. The last time I was in the hospital they encouraged us to stay out of our rooms and in the common areas. Do go to groups and be honest with your nurses and doctors.

    • roaring20s

      210d

      thank you so much for taking the time to reply! Honesty is definitely going to be the priority this time around.

      • butterfly39

        210d

        the first couple of times I wasn't completely honest with them and they were not able to help me like they should have. Once I was completely honest it made all the difference in the world. some things to be prepared for are:. You have many restrictions such as what you can have on the unit: nothing with strings, shoes, no books with string bookmarks, etc...,, No outside food or drink, depending on where you may be able to have colored pencils but no markers, other places you can only have markers no colored pencils. Some places will provide you with tape recorders to listen to in your room (music therapy). Some places have aquatic therapy and others don't. Most places have exercise therapy. You will see your doctor and care team every day. You will be assigned a nurse every shift. The nurse is supposed to check in with you at least once per shift to see how you are doing, if there are any new symptoms, any improvement, if you need anything, etc..., Honestly it depends on what hospital you go to as to what services they provide. I hope this post helps and wish you the best of luck.

  • Mbgjvb

    210d

    I went twice last year for three days at a time. Before you go in you can prepare by packing shirts, soft pants, sweaters, socks and underwear. Nothing with strings and nothing hard. You can write down a list of important phone numbers if you don’t have them memorized. They let me call for ten minutes at a time but it might be different in other places Yes be careful about who you talk to patient wise. A few of the people that I’ve met have made my mental state worse and distracted me instead of letting me focus on myself. You’ll probably be bored a lot. I talked and played games with the workers, watched movies in the group room, colored, and slept. I think that’s it for now, but Be honest about how you’re feeling. You’re there to get help. Good luck with whatever you decide to do

  • Trophy

    209d

    I went 3 times at 17 and once at 20 and the main difference is it’s a lot less strict on different things like in adolescent we couldn’t have hair ties and only one phone call a day but alot more relaxed in and obvious still a safe place because they’re not responsible for a persons kid once your an adult

  • Kitcat2000

    208d

    Adult you can actually have a say to you treatment. Just watch there are a lot of ppl who will try and take your things also adult ones don't really supply a lot of things typically its markers and crayons no pencils or pens except bendy pens

  • MirandasUniverse

    208d

    Hello, I have been admitted to inpatient a bit, a couple times as a teen and a few more times as an adult. It isn't fun, but it isn't like hell most of the time. They usually give you things to do like groups, but in my experience a lot of it is just waiting for the next activity or meal. People have said to keep to yourself, which I agree with to an extent. While it's good not to get too close or to open up too much, I find that being completely closed off can make it rather boring and made it harder to get through the day. I wouldn't go in there hoping to make longer-term friendships or relationships, but I usually have found myself playing games with people or talking a little. It's really all up to you, and yeah, be careful who you talk to of course, but trying to talk to others and not isolating tends to make it go faster, and if they see you out of your room and making an 'effort', they will get you out quicker, at least at the one I've been too. If you isolate and don't go to the groups, they tend to view that as you not trying. So be careful who you talk to and don't get too attached, but I don't think you necessarily have to keep to yourself completely. Just be careful. Good luck.

  • UnicornBug

    208d

    I have been in as a child and as an adult. As a child, inpatient facilities scarred me. I have night terrors of being there and I had told myself I would never go inpatient again. When I went as an adult, it was calm, soothing, supportive and I FINALLY felt like I was getting help. Just remember you are there for you. You can not allow yourself to get sucked into the other people's problems and I found that to be my biggest struggle. I started to worry about how others were doing and feeling more than focusing on myself so just try to be mindful. Lots of love. You can get through this. I believe in you!!

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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