Alatna

298d

i’ve been dealing with flashback/nightmares for a while now. recently started emdr for my trauma. i’m just so frustrated. i feel like i’ve worked through so much trauma, but it’s not getting any better. it’s just nightmare after nightmare. n recently i experienced a night terror for the first time since my childhood. it’s like whatever i do it’s never enough.

Melatonin

Trazodone

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Prazosin

Gabapentin

Dysuria

View all
  • crocodilegold

    297d

    It is such a long, hard journey. Rooting for you. Have you tried journaling and documenting all of your flashbacks, like a catalog? I did that with some of my triggers and it helped me avoid them until I was more ready to confront them. Now I'm stuck and not remembering things, but starting EMDR soon. Weighted blankets, CBD or THC (specifically a calming or sleep aid strain), maybe even melatonin might help. I find talking to someone about what's happening can also provide a little relief, and having a nighttime routine and comfort items ready. You could have a "kit" near where you sleep that has a journal, a candle or smell you like, a meditation app, peace affirmations, a comforting snack, blanket/stuffie. I try to make my bedroom as cozy as possible.

    • Alatna

      296d

      journaling has been suggested to me i’ve just not had the dedication to do it. but seeing as nothing else has worked i will definitely try it! i’ve actually made a little ,kit’ for my sensory breakdowns, but i never thought about one for ptsd/nightmares so thank you for the idea. i hope emdr works out for you!

  • Deanna8

    296d

    You should ask your doctor about prazosin. It’s a medication that helps to block nightmares. Fewer nightmares help me cope with everything else a lot better.

    • Jenny76

      296d

      I actually wondered if my prozsin was making my nightmare worse.

      • Rilo

        294d

        I stopped taking prozosin recently because of this. I’m doing a lot better. Still having nightmares but they are not NEARLY as disruptive

  • gravel.png

    296d

    I've had a lot of luck with trazodone to keep me asleep through the night. at my worst id have 4+ nightmares a night and sleep in hour-long bursts, but with trazodone I can stay asleep sometimes up to 10 hours. it's made a huge difference for me. I was also prescribed prazosin for my nightmares and that seems to have also helped. I totally understand how you feel. it can be extremely debilitating waking up and already feeling like garbage. fighting back to return to a productive state, especially in the morning, is incredibly painful. you got this though!

    • Alatna

      296d

      i’ve heard a lot about trazodone and prazosin so i’ll have to ask my doctor about it! thank you for the advice

  • Irish_Eyes

    296d

    I have a psychiatric service dog. He wakes up if I am having a nightmare. I sometimes have panic attacks in my sleep and he will wake me up. He gets me out of bed when the alarm goes off. He alerts me when I am very anxious or going into a panic attack. He leads me to sit down or lay down when I am having an episode. He does deep pressure therapy if I am hyperventilating or dissociative. He redirects me when I am doing unwanted behaviors like picking at my nails or tapping. He is kind of annoying. When he is redirecting me, I’m like no I want to pick my nails. But he is persistent and always wins. He is amazing. Dogs are very intuitive and will do some of these task naturally. The training provides consistency in alerts, and responding to you. Did you know you can train your own service dog? Did you know they do not have to be registered? I worked with a trainer but did some of the training myself. Did you know a psychiatric service dog is a service dog like any other type of service and protected by the ADA? Psychiatric service dogs are not emotional support animals. Psychiatric service dogs are trained to do a task or tasks.

    • Alatna

      296d

      wow that sounds very helpful! i’ve looked into service dogs and i’ve thought about training my german shepard. it’s something to do when i have more energy, or perhaps can afford a trainer.

      • Irish_Eyes

        296d

        You could start by reading books. There are Iseveral books on training a service dog. Don’t wait until you have the energy. I know it’s hard. One step at a time. I was stuck in the house. I never went anywhere. I work from home. My dog saved me. I walk him five times a day and we train still. He loves training. It’s playing to him. Your dog will love it. German Shepard are working dog and he will love having this job. I took my dog through some basic training first. He learned some things there that could lead into tasks. I am happy to share what I know.

  • Chaotic._.Bug

    296d

    I used to use melatonin, but my body gets used to medications pretty easily. We ended up using trazadone, and it worked really well. That is until the person causing trauma used it to cause trauma. But other than that I never have problems with it

  • Halsey

    296d

    I was prescribed Gabapentin for my night terrors (I take it 30-60 minutes before bedtime), and it has helped so much. I haven’t had a night terror for almost a year. I also began EMDR therapy around the same time I started the Gabapentin.

    • Alatna

      295d

      i’ll have to look into it, thanks for the insight!

    • Irish_Eyes

      280d

      My psychiatrist changed mine to daily instead of as needed. She also increased my dose to 300mg 3x/day because it wasn’t helping. Since that change, I have been better during the day and better at night. Like many medications, it can take a while to build up in your system and work.

  • loveshespoke

    294d

    Has your therapist implemented a "safe place" meditation? That honestly saved me during EMDR

    • Alatna

      294d

      yes actually, i kind of forgot about that so thanks for the reminder!

  • MoLucille

    294d

    There was stretch of time that I was having flashbacks of varying intensities - re-experiencing just emotions or physical sensations to reliving and acting out the trauma to intrusive memories all while experiencing a range of dissociation/awareness - multiple times a day. The biggest things that helped were having skills that required the least amount of effort, having another person around who know how and when to support me, and taking time to identify patterns (time, location, what memory, who I was with/what I was doing, trigger, what skills worked and what made it worse, etc.). Having recordings of grounding & breathing exercises on my phone that I could listen to and follow along with was very helpful. Also having tools needed to practice skills in all the places I could be and need them - notecard with list, essential oils on cotton ball in small container, ice packs and heat packs, mints/sour candy, something textured/for my hands. I also realized that using certain fidgets/skills made it harder to come all the out the flashbacks to the present because they were moderately triggering/connected to some part of the trauma. I find ice packs to be very helpful for flashbacks connected certain memory and extremely triggering for others. This was incredibly frustrating for me, people around me, & and therapist. My therapist helped me make a table with a bunch of labeled boxes that I could write very short answers to so that we could gather data and try to find any connections that would help me identify triggers, use skills/ground, and care for myself afterwards. It did take some time and I started with just tracking two things, but it ended up being so helpful. I go through periods when my flashbacks spike in frequency and intensity and times they slow down. I am here in it with you. Please feel free to message me to chat or ask anything!

☝ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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