PEMprincess

133d

If any of you with CFS/ME + fibromyalgia have managed to work/generate stable financial income and or go to school or continue education in any way PLEASE let me know. This can not be how the course of my life is destined to go. Anything helps.

Lethargy

Chronic Pain

Myalgic encephalomyelitis/ Chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS)

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  • Gracie1217

    133d

    Hi friend! I have CFS and fibromyalgia, among other things, and I have four college degrees and a two-year certification. It's possible and doable. ๐Ÿ’•

    • PEMprincess

      133d

      Thats such a relief to hear๐Ÿ™ Just a few questions that would help me tremendously!! What type of career(s) are you able to do? What accommodations & treatments/routines helped you get through your degrees, and howโ€™d you manage to get by financially in the meantime (food, housing, clothes, bills, transportation, doctors, treatments, medicine)? What type of help did you need if any/ what did support system look like (advice on a good way to structure mine with limited resources & fickle family)?

      • Gracie1217

        133d

        Okay, answers incoming! ๐Ÿค— At the moment I do freelance work in writing, editing, proofreading, data entry --- things I can do remotely (or heck even from bed on my laptop if I need). My degrees are in various subjects, one of which is actually English and writing, so that worked out. There are tons of resources online for finding job opportunities doable from home; try Googling "job opportunities for parents while kids are at school," for example, since those will mostly be home-based and flexible. My certification is in floral design, and I work as a temp for major holidays at a local florist; that way it's just a week's worth of shifts. Again, my approach is very piecemeal, which may not work for everybody. If you're not a writer, maybe you do bookkeeping from home, or coding and web design, or customer service. Sky's the limit, luckily. :)

      • Gracie1217

        133d

        I actually went through my degree programs with just one diagnosis (depression) at the time, though I was in the thick of being tested by tons of doctors to try to figure out why I had chronic pain and fatigue. Therefore, I'll have to tell you what I wish I had had in place through that process. I can recommend online classes quite strongly; most of mine were online, which was flexible enough that again I could work when I could concentrate. (The crossover to work/career would again be flexible remote work-from-home opportunities, either part-time or contract or just with really flexible hours.) I would have handled college much more effectively if I had stayed on top of the basics *religiously*, like staying hydrated (dehydration is one of the things that worsens my CFS exponentially if I'm not paying attention), and eating protein every few hours, eating healthy balanced meals, getting some form of movement (since jiggling my foot under the desk didn't count!) every day (walking to the mailbox counts), and having a really strict sleep schedule and routine (Google good sleep hygiene). A lot of my issues would at least have been lessened if I had been attending to basics. Also, I was an overachiever, taking upwards of 20 credits a semester; now, I would take the minimum allowed for full-time, or I would take one or two classes at once and take longer. Killing myself doing overtime set my health back a very long time. Financials are tough. I had a ton of scholarships, grants, and financial aid. There's a lot available, and most of it just sits there still available because people don't want to fill out a form and write an essay or ask someone for a reference letter. Work study is also an option, and some of those positions can be flexible. If you have an official diagnosis, you can try applying for disability, which would help cover your room and board costs. Textbooks can be rented or purchased used. There are ways to make it work. I won't lie: The system isn't the easiest or fairest to navigate for those of us already struggling. Sometimes a doctor's notice of your conditions, taken to a student services department, will get you accommodations. A lot of people are willing to work with you if you're upfront about your limitations and your willingness to communicate and do your absolute best. It's tough when family isn't in your corner. My support system consists these days of my sister, two close friends locally, two women I've connected with through church, eight or ten friends long-distance (some of them were local at first then moved), the pastor at my church, my GP, my physical therapist, and my DBT (dialectical behavioral therapist). I've also participated in therapy support groups for chronic illness, and I still have some contacts through that too. It's really a matter of sorting people with common interests as you, and/or their own health issues so they can emphasize, and/or people who just accept and love you unconditionally and would be happy to deliver groceries or bring you soup when you're having a flare. ๐Ÿ’•

โ˜ This content is generated by our users and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult with your physician before making any medical decision

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